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Research

A drop-style topdresser can deliver sand to the putting surface with high precision. This operator is applying 1 cubic foot of sand per 1,000 square feet. (photo by: Brian Whitlark, USGA Green Section)

Why light and frequent topdressing programs are important

July 27, 2021 By and
Sand topdressing is one of the most important practices for producing smooth putting surfaces and diluting thatch and organic matter. Despite this fact, some courses only apply sand during aeration or infrequently during the golf season to avoid disrupting golfers ...

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Plot treated with drench application of SDS and hollow tine aerification one day after treatment (left) and three days after (right). (Photo courtesy of Zane Raudenbush)

Super Science: Moss control in putting greens

July 26, 2021 By
Zane Raudenbush, Ph.D. initiated field studies to test the effectiveness of various soil surfactants on moss growth in creeping bentgrass putting greens. ...

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Mosquito (Photo: pernsanitfoto / istock–Getty images plus / getty images)

Turf Pest: Biting back at mosquitoes

July 22, 2021 By
Janis Reed, Ph.D., of Control Solutions Inc. explains how golf course superintendents can control mosquitoes on the course. ...

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Moisture sensors on golf course (Photo: Turf-Tec International)

Experts’ Insights: What to know about moisture sensors

July 15, 2021 By
Moisture sensors dramatically improve greens management, but it's important for superintendents to know their own course's conditions. ...

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Dale Sanson, Ph.D., scientist for PBI-Gordon (Photo courtesy of PBI Gordon)

PBI-Gordon’s Dale Sanson discusses SpeedZone and its influence on golf

July 8, 2021 By
Dale Sanson, Ph.D., discusses his career at PBI-Gordon, SpeedZone herbicies and what it's like to influence the game of golf. ...

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Photo by: Control Solutions Inc.

Turf Pest of the Month: How to keep fire ants at bay

July 6, 2021 By
Fire ants can be easily identified by the mounds they build — a useful piece of information to avoid getting too close to the female fire ants, which can sting. “They typically like building their mounds in areas that are ...

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