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Author Archive

Photo: Karl Danneberger

About Karl Danneberger, Ph.D.

Karl Danneberger, Ph.D., is a professor in the department of horticulture and crop science at The Ohio State University. He is author of the popular The Turf Doc column that appears monthly in Golfdom. Karl writes on topics ranging from Poa annua to pest control.

Posts by Karl Danneberger, Ph.D.

Turf MD: Why we need to remember the benefits of PGRs Posted on 10 May 2022 in the Columns & Current Issue & Featured & From the Magazine categories.

Karl Danneberger, Ph.D., talks about the application and absorption characteristics of ingredients in plant growth regulators (PGRs). Read more»

Turf MD: Top five golf pet peeves Posted on 28 Apr 2022 in the Columns & Featured & From the Magazine categories.

Karl Danneberger, Ph.D., discusses his biggest golf pet peeves and common mistakes that golfers make from a maintenance perspective. Read more»

Turf MD: A high honor for turf Posted on 16 Mar 2022 in the Columns & From the Magazine categories.

Karl Danneberger, Ph.D., explains the importance of Michigan State's new Joe Vargas Chair in Plant Pathology to the turfgrass industry. Read more»

Turf MD: Eclectic look at early spring Posted on 08 Feb 2022 in the From the Magazine categories.

Karl Danneberger Ph.D, discusses the physiological, pathological and climatological factors that turfgrasses are faced with at the start of spring. Read more»

Turf MD: Embracing a changing workforce Posted on 20 Jan 2022 in the Columns & Featured & From the Magazine categories.

Karl Danneberger, Ph.D., discusses how the golf course world needs to focus on the values of diversity, equity and inclusion to attract a diverse workforce. Read more»

Turf MD: Cold hardiness Posted on 04 Jan 2022 in the Columns & Featured & From the Magazine & Research categories.

Golfdom columnist Karl Danneberger, Ph.D., describes the ins and outs of cold hardiness of turfgrass and how to avoid turf stress in the winter. Read more»