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Wonder women: Women in Golf 2020

By , and |  November 10, 2020 0 Comments

What made you brave?

Kelly Lynch, regional manager, Pure Seed, pushed attendees to think when she asked, “What made you brave?”

Her own experience becoming a professional golfer at age 18, becoming a member of the PGA at 23, coaching Division I men’s and women’s golf and Division I rowing, and eventually, making the jump to the seed industry, all resulted from her contacts, so Lynch urged the women present to be brave, reach out to people and have a conversation.

Lynch also offered an unusual analogy for the time and energy we give ourselves and one another: peanut butter.

“You can give away as much peanut butter as you want, but if you don’t keep enough for yourself, for your mental and emotional health, you’re losing in the deal … I learned to say no, and those are the gifts that I had to replenish for me,” she said. “I’m really good at working,” Lynch added, “but I had to become really good at living.”

Kimberly Erusha, Ph.D., principal at Kimberly Erusha Consulting, said that personal development is important for building confidence in your skills and in your career. Erusha has had a stellar career in turf, moving up from a technical writer at the USGA to director of education to managing director of the USGA Green Section to now heading her own consulting firm.

Christi Clay, CSFM, (left) and Sun Roesslein, CSFM, of North Area Athletic Complex, Arvada, Colo. Roesslein says it’s unusual to have two women managing an athletic complex. (Photo courtesy of Christi Clay)

Christi Clay, CSFM, (left) and Sun Roesslein, CSFM, of North Area Athletic Complex, Arvada, Colo. Roesslein says it’s unusual to have two women managing an athletic complex. (Photo courtesy of Christi Clay)

“Take those personal development opportunities and recognize that you bring a unique perspective to your role,” she advised. “Never underestimate the power you have as a female who really knows her stuff,” she said. “Use that professional development to hone in on your industry. You need to be able to articulate your skills and what advantage you bring to that organization. You need to be able to file that away and come back to it. Really listen and follow through. Don’t doubt yourself.”

Carol Rau, a certified professional in human resources, also led the group in examining how they can best present themselves and their leadership skills to a prospective employer.

“Elevate how you come together with people on your team and other people who are nothing like you to provide a great experience to your customer,” Rau advised. “Don’t forget to use the word ‘leadership.’ If you want to be characterized as someone with leadership skills — you’ve got to use the word.”

Rau also stressed that when explaining experience in an interview, don’t get caught up in the weeds — that is, look at the big picture, not just how you can solve technical problems with turf, since everyone interviewing for that job has those skills.

“Golfers love golf, not turf,” she explained. “Showing how you work together with your leadership team to grow the game of golf is a great way to stand out … show how you drive success for your team.”

This article is tagged with , , and posted in From the Magazine, People

About the Author:

Sarah Webb is Golfdom's managing editor. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Wittenberg University, where she studied journalism and Spanish. Prior to her role at Golfdom, Sarah was an intern for Cleveland Magazine and a writing tutor.


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